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Review of Chouinard Art Institute Alumnus Timothy Washington

July 8, 2013
The Loft at Liz's

Timothy Washington

Timothy Washington’s found object assemblage art was influenced by his family and neighborhood, by his sensitivity to the materials around him and by God’s own creations—which he considers his number one form of inspiration.  He also acknowledges his Grandmother, who made beautiful, hi-relief quilts and blankets with little treasures tucked inside them, and his Grandfather, a skillful carpenter. In addition, the artist acknowledges a professional artist neighbor who let him handle materials when he was about six or seven, and of course, life itself.  He used to walk around his Watts neighborhood and pick up objects that he could transform and incorporate into his art.

Washington does not think of himself as self-taught, as he won a scholarship to the Chouinard Art Institute in Los Angeles and cites everyone from Gauguin to Da Vinci, Michelangelo to Modigliani, as having been influential at varying times; he does think that “the gift or the talent comes from God,” and he pretty much dismissed what he was taught in school to fashion his work on a spiritual level as well as with an intrinsic approach that “comes from our forefathers.” Read More

Calarts Music Student and Guitarist-turned-drummer Produces First Album

July 8, 2013
All About Jazz

By Edward Blanco

Alex Snydman: Fortunate Action (2013)

Guitarist-turned-drummer Alex Snydman left behind an established East Coast presence in the Massachusetts and New York area jazz scenes for graduate studies at The California Institute of the Arts and, while in Los Angeles, has produced his very first album as leader with the highly audacious Fortunate Action. A student of Joe La Barbera, Bob Gullotti and Eric Harland, among others, Snydman's assertive, yet finessed style, combined with his talent as a composer, marks this debut a winner on many fronts and goes a long way in establishing this young jazz lion as a future drummer of note.

The album—consisting of nine fine selections of originals and standards, all featuring Snydman in variations of trio and quartet formats alongside an assortment of young, up- and-coming players like pianists Chris Pattishall, Doug Abramson and Miro Sprague, and accompanied by bassists Alec Derian and Tyler Heydolph—illuminates a varied, challenging and very creative musical statement. This is quite evident from Pattishal's opening "In Joy," with a soft-toned introduction that develops quite nicely around a gospel-influenced core. Read More

CalArts gets top ranking among animation programs

July 2, 2013
Animation Career Review

Top 20 Animation and Game Design Schools on the West Coast

Our 2013 list of the Top 20 Animation and Game Design Schools on the West Coast. 

For the record, we define the West Coast as California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, Hawaii, and Idaho.

1. California Institute of the Arts, Valencia, CaliforniaCalifornia Institute of the Arts (CalArts) began with the merger of the Los Angeles Conservatory of Music (est. 1883) and the Chouinard Art Institute (est. 1921). Roy O. Disney and his younger brother Walt Disney “guided” the merger in 1961 to form California Institute of the Arts. The school received accreditation in 1964. CalArts’ first academic year began in 1970 with 650 students (by 1971) and six schools including Art, Critical Studies, Design, Film, Music, and Theater & Dance. Read More.

CalArts' East of Borneo creates a pop-up newsstand in Culver City

June 28, 2013
Hyperallergic

By Allison Meier

The Rise of the Artist Newsstand

This summer several art newsstands are bringing independent media to the city streets and subways, with piles of zines and DIY publications offered in the tradition of newsstands. Handsomely constituting a small trend, the newsstands currently installed in New York and Los Angeles are looking to engage a larger public with offbeat media, while still acting like a hub of information and interaction — just like any other newsstand.

The Newsstand, which opened earlier this month in the Lorimer/Metropolitan G and L train connection in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, was curated by Lele Saveri of the 8-Ball Zine Fair for creative media company ALLDAYEVERYDAY. Lodged in the space of a former MTA newsstand, there are international zines and offerings from publishers like Desert Island Books, Miniature Garden, Dashwood Books, Hamburger Eyes, and Peradam, and some magazines organized by McNally Jackson. A sticker machine sits out front, and small stacks of press are even offered for free. When I stopped by, there was a photo shoot happening (as you do with a hip, underground, well-curated art newsstand), but there seemed to be a fair amount of people stopping by anyway from the endless travelers in movement through the station. Read More

Profile of jazz artist and Calarts Alumnus Peter Epstein

June 30, 2013
RGJ

By Susan Skorupa

Sunday Profile: After life of jazz performer, saxophonist Epstein lands at UNR

Peter Epstein has covered a lot of ground in the past 30 years.

As a musician, he’s performed all over the world in about 25 countries, made New York City his base as a jazz saxophonist for 10 years, earned two degrees in music performance, led some bands, performed in others and recorded about 50 CDs.

Epstein is one of the recipients of the Nevada Arts Council 2014 fellowships given to practitioners of the performing, literary and visual arts.
“It’s a huge honor, a very generous and significant award,” Epstein said.

After more than a decade teaching music in the University of Nevada, Reno Department of Music, Epstein also has the satisfaction of watching students he’s taught successfully follow their own paths in music. Read More

Profile of artist and Calarts Alumnus Peter Epstein

June 30, 2013
RGJ

By Susan Skorupa

Sunday Profile: After life of jazz performer, saxophonist Epstein lands at UNR

Peter Epstein has covered a lot of ground in the past 30 years.

As a musician, he’s performed all over the world in about 25 countries, made New York City his base as a jazz saxophonist for 10 years, earned two degrees in music performance, led some bands, performed in others and recorded about 50 CDs.

Epstein is one of the recipients of the Nevada Arts Council 2014 fellowships given to practitioners of the performing, literary and visual arts.
“It’s a huge honor, a very generous and significant award,” Epstein said.

After more than a decade teaching music in the University of Nevada, Reno Department of Music, Epstein also has the satisfaction of watching students he’s taught successfully follow their own paths in music. Read More

Profile of artist and Chouinard Art Institute alumnus Ed Rucha

July 1, 2013
New Yorker

By Calvin Tomkins

ED RUSCHA’S L.A.

If you need cheering up, go to the Museum of Modern Art and look at a painting called “Oof,” by Edward Ruscha. The title and the subject are identical, just those three block letters, each one bigger than your head, in cadmium yellow on a background of cobalt blue. The six-foot-square canvas currently hangs in Gallery 19, on the fourth floor, along with Roy Lichtenstein’s “Girl with Ball,” Andy Warhol’s “Gold Marilyn Monroe” and “Orange Car Crash Fourteen Times,” and other Pop Art trailblazers of the early nineteen-sixties. “Oof” outdoes them all in its immediate, antic impact. This is not the kind of picture that reveals hidden depths on subsequent viewings. Everything is right there, every time, and it never fails to make me feel good.

Ruscha (pronounced Ru-shay) was twenty-six when he painted it, in 1963, three years out of art school, living in Los Angeles, and already hitting his stride. He had vetoed the spontaneous, loose-elbow, Abstract Expressionist style that still prevailed at the Chouinard Art Institute, where he studied in the late nineteen-fifties, shortly before it became the California Institute of the Arts (CalArts). “They would say, Face the canvas and let it happen, follow your own gestures, let the painting create itself,” he later recalled in an interview, but that didn’t pan out for him. Ruscha had seen, reproduced in the magazine Print, a Jasper Johns collage painting called “Target with Four Faces,” and it had opened up a new range of possibilities. He decided that whatever he was going to do in art would have to be “completely premeditated.” Read More

Room number for CalArts' legendary classroom A113 appears in Monsters University

June 25, 2013
Hypable

By Andrew Sims

‘Monsters University’ Easter eggs: A complete list (updated: high-res pics!)

Monsters University opened in theaters this past Friday, and those who are Pixar fanatics know that they needed to keep a close eye out for Easter eggs.

Every Pixar film has a slew of Easter eggs – from ones that appear in nearly ever Pixar movie (A113, the Luxor Ball, the Pizza Planet truck) to ones that are more rare like a character from A Bug’s Life appearing in a Toy Story movie.

Monsters University’s Easter eggs are just as clever, hidden, and a joy to catch. Below are the ones we’ve found.

- A113: You’ll see the infamous classroom number on Professor Love’s lecture hall door when Sulley first enters. A113 is a reference to a classroom at CalArts where Pixar’s Chief Creative Executive Officer John Lasseter and director Brad Bird went to school. Read More

CalArts cited in review of artist Paul McCarthy’s installation at the Park Avenue Armory

June 25, 2013
Gallerist NY

By Maika Pollack

‘Paul McCarthy: WS’ at the Park Avenue Armory

It’s a strange, strange world where Paul McCarthy has enough money to do whatever he wants. Before 2013, Mr. McCarthy, Los Angeles cult artist and, more recently, auction-house favorite, had not exhibited much in New York—just an obscene animatronic sculpture here, a scatological Pinocchio video there. Now, thanks to Armory artistic director Alex Poots, Serpentine Gallery co-director Hans Ulrich Obrist, CCS Bard executive director Tom Eccles and, of course, the invisible hand of the marketplace, we are not just getting the 68-year-old Mr. McCarthy’s biggest ever installation, at the Park Avenue Armory, but also two simultaneous gallery shows at Hauser & Wirth’s uptown and downtown spaces. As one contemporary artist quipped to me, “It’s Paul-a-palooza.”

It’s true that the new multi-channel video installation “WS” is one of the dirtier art exhibitions you’ll ever see—it more than earns its NC-17 rating (no children under 17 are allowed entry). But it is in its relationship to excess and capitalism that the piece’s real shock factor lies. Read More

Calarts Alumna and Pop Opera Singer Aleigh O'Sullivan Signs Music Deal

June 25, 2013
Zimbio

By Hollywood Teen Comedy

Andrew Lane, Drew Right Music launches pop opera singer Aleigh O'Sullivan

Aleigh O'Sullivan signs with 20X multi-platinum music producer, Andrew Lane, owner of Drew Right Music record label.  Mr. Lane released Aleigh O'Sullivan's debut videos entitled "You're Still Here" and "Al Fine" at a music video release party in Hollywood, CA on June 21, 2013.

Aleigh O’Sullivan was born into an Irish family in Kingman, Arizona in 1991. A self-proclaimed “daddy’s girl,” she grew up hunting and bowling. “I’m a country girl,” Aleigh beams. However, her mother felt it important to provide a well-rounded upbringing by taking Aleigh to pageants, where she earned scholarships helping to pay for her college tuition. Nevertheless, Aleigh knew, from a very early age, that she would pursue a path of singing. “It’s been a dream of mine for as long as I can remember.”

Aleigh describes her natural talent as something from deep within. None of her family has a musical background nor any knowledge of the music field; she was never predisposed to music other than when her parents played Andrea Bocelli or Luciano Pavarotti. Aleigh remembers listening to “The Phantom of the Opera” when she was three years old and having an extremely strong reaction. The music spoke to her. Around the same time, Aleigh’s parents realized she had a singing talent which they felt should not be ignored. Aleigh recalls her parents sacrificing significantly for her singing and piano lessons when she was very young. Her parents and grandparents would rearrange their schedules so that she could continue her music studies. By the time she was 5, she was reading sheet music. Read More

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